Thursday, September 28, 2023

Murder Most Royal - SJ Bennett

SJ Bennett has just released Murder Most Royal, the third book in the 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates' series. I've read the previous two entries and have quite enjoyed them.

This third book takes place at Christmas 2016 at Queen Elizabeth's beloved Sandringham House. I love the details Bennett gives her physical settings. It lets me create vivid mental images, not just of Sandringham, but other settings that the book visits. And it's at one of those other locations that a severed hand, still wearing a signet ring, is found. It is the Queen who identifies the ring. 

Now, the Queen is not the one physically investigating. But she is conducting a secret inquiry of her own alongside the formal investigation. She again employs her Assistant Private Secretary Rozie Oshodi, to be her eyes, ears and legs, reporting back only to her. This time around the Queen is doing more investigating herself than in the previous two books. She knows all of the family ties of her titled neighbours and uses that information to gently direct the constabulary.

I initially had concerns over how the Queen would be portrayed in that first book. Well, I didn't need to worry. She is drawn as kind, gracious, wise, highly intelligent, well-spoken, observant, but imposing as well. All quite true. Her inner dialogue is a treat to read and her sense of humor is dry, as are her observations about her Royal family. The relationship between the Queen And Prince Phillip is lovely and loving

Rozie brings her own take on things as well. Bennett weaves current events from 2016, such as Brexit, through the book. 

The plotting is well done, giving a believable reason and victim by book's end. There are a number of characters to keep track of and more than once I had to stop and think who was who. 

I quite enjoyed Murder Most Royal. It's a fun, clever read that could be considered cozy. But with corgis and no cats. :0)  See for yourself - read an excerpt of Murder Most Royal. I'll be waiting for number four!

Tuesday, September 26, 2023

Bright Lights, Big Christmas - Mary Kay Andrews

I'm always excited to hear that Mary Kay Andrews has a new book coming out. And even better? This latest is a Christmas tale - Bright Lights, Big Christmas!

MKA gives us a great lead in Kerry Tolliver. She's thoughtful, caring and is someone you'd love to have in your friends circle. She and her brother Murphy are heading to Greenwich Village in New York City to sell their Christmas trees. Her family been doing this since the 1950's and the neighborhood always welcomes them back. But there's competition this year...

I love the setting. Having a Christmas tree stand as a focal point is fun and different. As is Spammy - the trailer that Murphy and Kerry are living in.
 
 There's a wealth of supporting characters in the neighborhood and local businesses. All of them are kind, good people. (And I kind of wished I had an apartment in the neighborhood.) Austin is one of the key players - he's six years old and steals the show more than once. And at the other end is Mr. Heinz, a cantankerous older gentleman. In between are some candidates for the romance plot line that MKA always weaves into her books. Oh, and a dog named Queenie as well. 

Relationships of all kinds are explored in Bright Lights, Big Christmas. Difficult issues, questions, situations and more are resolved by the final pages. And that's what I expect and love about MKA's writing. Feel good fiction that tugs at the heartstrings. And fills you with the holiday spirit! See for yourself - read an excerpt of Bright Lights, Big Christmas. 

Bright Lights, Big Christmas - Mary Kay Andrews

I'm always excited to hear that Mary Kay Andrews has a new book coming out. And even better? This latest is a Christmas tale - Bright Lights, Big Christmas!

MKA gives us a great lead in Kerry Tolliver. She's thoughtful, caring and is someone you'd love to have in your friends circle. She and her brother Murphy are heading to Greenwich Village in New York City to sell their Christmas trees. Her family been doing this since the 1950's and the neighborhood always welcomes them back. But there's competition this year...

I love the setting. Having a Christmas tree stand as a focal point is fun and different. As is Spammy - the trailer that Murphy and Kerry are living in.
 
There's a wealth of supporting characters in the neighborhood and local businesses. All of them are kind, good people. (And I kind of wished I had an apartment in the neighborhood.) Austin is one of the key players - he's six years old and steals the show more than once. And at the other end is Mr. Heinz, a cantankerous older gentleman. In between are some candidates for the romance plot line that MKA always weaves into her books. Oh, and a dog named Queenie as well. 

Relationships of all kinds are explored in Bright Lights, Big Christmas. Difficult issues, questions, situations and more are resolved by the final pages. And that's what I expect and love about MKA's writing. Feel good fiction that tugs at the heartstrings. And fills you with the holiday spirit!

Kathleen McInerney narrated the audiobook version. She did a fabulous job of interpreting and presenting Mary Kay Andrews' work. McInerney has a very versatile voice. The voice for Kerry was sweet and kind and made you want to hear what she had to say. Kerry's voice had an interesting up and down that I liked. Murphy's voice was gruff, matching the character. And she created a believable voice for a six year old boy. Hare to do.  Different voices were used for all the characters, making it easy to know who was speaking. She spoke clearly and enunciated well and was easy to listen. Her voice helped me to cement the mental pictures I drew of the characters. Hear for yourself - listen to an audio excerpt of Bright Lights, Big Christmas.

Monday, September 25, 2023

Murder in the Blitz - F. L. Everett

F.L. Everett's new book, Murder in the Blitz, ticks all the boxes in one of my new favorite storytelling styles. Such as...set in the WWII years, a plucky female protagonist, a mystery, a crime, an excellent crew of supporting characters, a devious culprit and more. 

Manchester 1940. Edie has worked at a local newspaper for the last five years. She yearns for something more than being a typist and tea maker - such as the crime beat. But, she'll take the chance she's been offered and she'll give it her all. After all, being an obituarist, is a step closer, isn't it? And yes, Edie's path does indeed cross that of a crime... 

Edie is easy to like and get behind. She's tenacious, determined and has a good heart. But - she's more than a little na├»ve sometimes. (I wanted to point out certain people and their behaviour to her!) Her roommate Annie is a good sidekick character. I hope that she, and the two other supporting characters are back in the next entry. I think the door is open for a burgeoning relationship - or two. 

Everett captures the 'can do, keep calm' attitude of war time England. Lots of detail cements the mental image I created of the setting. 

The mystery is a good one and suitable for the time. The path to the aha moment is easier for the reader to see I think. Edie is a few steps behind. But that's the fun of cozy mysteries, isn't it?

This is the first book in a planned series - the Edie York Mysteries. I'll be watching for the second book. See for yourself - read an excerpt of Murder in the Blitz. 

Thursday, September 21, 2023

The Square of Sevens - Laura Shepherd-Robinson

Oh. My. Gosh. Laura Shepherd-Robinson's novel, The Square of Sevens, is an absolutely fantastic listen!

Why? Well firstly it's set in and around 1730's England. Shepherd-Robinson's descriptions of time and place are carefully and beautifully drawn. The architecture, the daily lives of the rich and those who serve them. The language, the mores, the expectations of society. And...the machinations taking place behind closed doors.

An orphaned fortune teller is our protagonist. Red is taken in by a gentleman and raised as a lady. But. Oh, there's such a good but! Who was her mother and why was her father always on the lookout for an unnamed enemy? In addition to her voice, there's another. Lucifer Dark (love the name), is just as determined to keep those secrets locked up. Answers to those questions and more are what drives the book forward. Shepherd-Robinson's plotting is simply stellar. Clues, lies, truths, twists and turns are all scattered on the way to the final pages. All I can say without spoiling things for you is that the plot is so very clever! And those final chapters? Did not see that coming. 

Fortune-telling figures into everything. Red is an expert in an old method called the Square of Sevens. And it is this skill that lets her in many a door. I loved this bit - each chapter starts with a reading and what those two cards denote. Each one figures into what is going to happen in that chapter.

I chose to listen to The Square of Sevens. The reader was Imogen Wilde and she was the perfect choice for this book. Her speed of reading is not rushed, but is thoughtful. Her accent is lovely to listen to and she enunciates well. Her voice matched the mental images I had of the characters. She provides many voices for a large and varied cast. Wilde interprets Shepherd-Robinson's work very well - the emotion, the actions and in particular - the conversations. I felt like I was there in the 1700's.

An excellent performance of a fantastic book! Hear for yourself - listen to an audio excerpt of The Square of Sevens.  20 hours and 14 minutes.

Wednesday, September 20, 2023

Release week for Black Sheep by Rachel Harrison

I always check out the cover of a new book before turning the first page of a new book. That sheep is more than a little eerie... 

Black Sheep by Rachel Harrison has just released. What's it about? From the publisher, Berkley:

"A cynical twentysomething must confront her unconventional family’s dark secrets in this fiery, irreverent horror novel from the author of Such Sharp Teeth and Cackle.
 
Nobody has a “normal” family, but Vesper Wright’s is truly…something else. Vesper left home at eighteen and never looked back—mostly because she was told that leaving the staunchly religious community she grew up in meant she couldn’t return. But then an envelope arrives on her doorstep. 
 
Inside is an invitation to the wedding of Vesper’s beloved cousin Rosie. It’s to be hosted at the family farm. Have they made an exception to the rule? It wouldn’t be the first time Vesper’s been given special treatment. Is the invite a sweet gesture? An olive branch? A trap? Doesn’t matter. Something inside her insists she go to the wedding. Even if it means returning to the toxic environment she escaped. Even if it means reuniting with her mother, Constance, a former horror film star and forever ice queen.
 
When Vesper’s homecoming exhumes a terrifying secret, she’s forced to reckon with her family’s beliefs and her own crisis of faith in this deliciously sinister novel that explores the way family ties can bind us as we struggle to find our place in the world. See for yourself - read an excerpt of Black Sheep.

Photo: © Nic Harris
"Rachel Harrison is the national bestselling author of Such Sharp Teeth, Cackle, and The Return, which was nominated for a Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement in a First Novel. Her short fiction has appeared in Guernica, in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading, as an Audible Original, and in her debut collection, Bad Dolls. She lives in western New York with her husband and their cat/overlord." 

You can connect with Rachel on her website, also on Instagram, as well as X(Twitter).

Tuesday, September 19, 2023

Saving Emma - Allen Eskens

 Allen Eskens is hands down, one of my favorite authors. I've enjoyed each and every one of the books he's written. His latest - Saving Emma is no exception.

Lawyer Boady Sanden is part of The Innocence Project. The goal is to revisit a case when new information is found. Elijah's sister approaches Boady sure that her brother is innocent, despite being convicted of murder. Boady very reluctantly says he will.

Boady has a lot on his plate. His ward Emma is questioning her life. And another relative opened their door to her. But, Boady and his wife Dee question the motive behind that move. And then there's a connection that's so unexpected....

What makes Eskens' books so good? Well, his lead characters for one thing. They're never perfect or hotshots. Instead they're real and believable, making mistakes along the way, but trying to do their best. The supporting characters are just as well drawn. Dee is the voice of reason and emotions, doing her best as well. The antagonists? Yeah, it won't be too hard to pinpoint the 'bad guys.' 

Then there's the plotting. Fantastic melding of two seemingly disparate plotlines. One of the main parts is easily recognizable from television and news. The other is a 'couldn't be predicted' element. And finally, a nice gotcha in the final pages. Morality, family and faith are woven into the story as well. 

And then the writing itself.  It's easy to be drawn in the story and I'm always eager to see what the next chapter will bring. Eskens is just so 'readable'. See for yourself - read an excerpt of Saving Emma.  

Monday, September 18, 2023

Murder in the Family - Cara Hunter

Oh wow! Cara Hunter's new book, Murder in the Family, is crazy good! 

Why? Well, first up is the style used in telling the tale. It's an epistolary novel - not bits of it, but all of it! 

The book is setup as a true crime show with six experts determined to solve a twenty year old cold case. Police reports, emails, memos, online chat rooms, interviews, memories, newspaper clippings, texts, messages, old photos, suppositions, clues and more are all there for the reader to see.

But - can you determine who the culprit is? I couldn't! Which is absolutely fine with me. I truly enjoy being unable to solve a mystery book. Hunter makes it very difficult to solve, with multiple twists and turns that change the direction of the investigation. Fantastic!

There is a large cast of characters in Murder in the Family. There's a detailed bio for each of the prime characters at the beginning of the book. I had to refer to it at first, but I came to 'know' them all as the book progressed. There's a wide variety of personalities. Some will rub you the wrong way, others are know-it-all, some are secretive and more....

Murder in the Family was a treat to read. Addictive, clever and unique. Loved it. See for yourself - read an excerpt of Murder in the Family. 

Friday, September 15, 2023

Silence for the Dead - Simone St. James

I've just discovered that Simone St. James has a new book coming out in March 2024! While I wait for Murder Road, I'm catching up on her older titles that I've missed.

Silence for the Dead is a great period piece, set in 1919 in a remote hospital for shell-shocked soldiers. Our protagonist is Kitty Weekes who has applied to, and has been hired to work as a nurse at Portis House. The problem? She's not a nurse and she's running from her past. She has nowhere else to go.

But there's something off about Portis House those who run the hospital.  And there are strange noises and sightings of a mysterious figure. 

St. James excels in creating atmospheric settings. The possibilities of otherworldly events and characters is right alongside of that which can be confirmed. But not everyone is telling their truth.

I become more immersed in some books when I listen and that was definitely the case for Silence for the Dead. The reader was  Billie Fulford-Brown and she did an excellent job. Her voice was perfect for the lead character and matched the mental image I had created for Kitty. She's a versatile narrator, creating and using many different voices and accents for other characters, male and female. She captures the nuances, emotions and actions of the plot. A great performance and an excellent tale. Hear for your self - listen to an audio excerpt.  

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

Hemlock Island - Kelley Armstrong

I really enjoy Kelley Armstrong's writing. She's a prolific author and isn't bound to one genre. Her latest is Hemlock Island - a horror tale. (And it is a standalone)

That cover hints at what the reader is in for. What you'll find is a private island and a group of friends, family and frenemies. And more.....

Laney is the owner, but she has had to rent out the island and cottage to make ends meets. When a renter calls to report a closet with what looks like fingernail scratches and a lot of blood in a closet, Laney and her niece head to the island. This isn't the only 'thing' that's happened, but it has been escalating. Four other people join Laney, even though they weren't invited. 

There is definitely something wrong on island - very, very wrong. And that's all you're going to get from me. I always think going in cold is the best way to experience some books and I don't want to spoil it for you. Suffice to say that Armstrong has a vivid and more than a little scary imagination! Gentle readers, there are some gory bits.

But in addition to the horror aspect, Armstrong has written a strong plot that explores the personal life of her protagonists - in this case its Laney. The other characters we come to know through Lane's eyes, interactions and experiences with them. This is always a strong point of Armstrong's writing. 

The last chapters caught me off guard with an unexpected finish. Creepily good.

Monday, September 11, 2023

The Sunset Years of Agnes Sharp - Leonie Swann

I've discovered I have a newly found affinity for mysteries with seniors as the protagonists. Why? Maybe because I'm getting closer to that age group!

The Sunset Years of Agnes Sharp by Leonie Swann is one of those books.

Swann opens the book with Hettie perusing a curious set of shoes. Hettie just happens to be a tortoise! But she's one of a group of characters that populate Sunset Hall. The Hall is home to a group of seniors that live as a family. They're determined to not be sent to a institutional care home. They're a quirky bunch, all with some health issues, with memory loss being one of them. Swann alludes to their past employments, but I'll let you discover what those might be.

A body is found in their greenhouse (classic) and then another next door. There's no doubt about it - these are both murders and it's definitely too close to home! And of course, they start their own investigation. Given that memory loss is at the top of the list, we have more than one unreliable narrator. 
The past and present collide many times. What's now and what's then? As a reader we don't know and the path to the final aha moment doubles back on itself more than once.

I quite enjoyed this book, the characters, the premise and the plot. I do think it could be shortened up a wee bit though. See for yourself - read an excerpt of the Sunset Years of Agnes Sharp.

Friday, September 8, 2023

Gull Island - Anna Porter

Gull Island is Anna Porter's new novel. 

Jude's father has not been seen in almost a month. Him disappearing is not unusual, but Jude's mother wants her to look anyway. One of the last places left to look is Gull Island, a private island and home to the family cottages. It's early in the season still with snow still on the ground. She doesn't think he'll be there, but her mother has also asked her to look for some documents. 

The lead characters is of course Jude. Everything we see and hear is from her view and perceptions. With every new picture she finds or a treasure found from her younger days, memories of her childhood are remembered and inspected.

Is what she remembers the truth? Has she covered up the ugliness and hidden it away all these years?  As a reader, can I believe what she is saying and seeing? Why? Well, Jude is a (very) unreliable narrator, for a number of reasons. She's a raging alcoholic for one. But what about the noises she's hearing? This uncertainty kept me turning pages to the final chapter. I had to know what the truth was. Porter teases the reader, dropping foreshadowing many times and alluding to what happened in the past. 

"My dreams were leeching into my consciousness, making it hard to know what was real. That's all. I had to focus." 

Porter has given us a detailed setting for the novel. I was able to easily build the island in my mind.

Gull Island is a slow burning read, one that takes the reader through a disturbing exploration of a dysfunctional family. See for yourself - read an excerpt of Gull Island.

Thursday, September 7, 2023

Holly - Stephen King

A new Stephen King book? Yes! With Holly Gibley running the show? Yes! She's the lead in King's brand new book - Holly.

Like me, those who are fans of Holly already know how tenacious and determined she is. But, this latest case for her investigative firm of Finders Keepers will push her to the limit. And she's working alone. Holly takes place in the times of Covid. King shares Holly's views on the pandemic and they are woven into the narrative. ;0)

King starts off the book with a heckuva first chapter. We get to meet the antagonists right off the bat. And what a pair they are. Creepy, devious, dangerous - and they're not what or who you imagine. And that's what is letting them to get away with what they're doing.

One of my favorite things about King's writing are the details he incorporates into his stories. We get to 'know' the victims and they're not just a body. Same with the killers - icky as they are. And most of all Holly herself. Her self doubts, the issues she's facing, and so much more. The supporting cast is also quite detailed. I like the return to favorite characters. 

Holly is contacted by a mother to look for her missing teenage daughter. The clues are there, but most would not see the connections. Holly does. Could there be other victims? King's plotting is fantastic!

What a tale! I've said before that I often feel more immersed in a book when I listen to it. And this is definitely the case with Holly. The reader was Justine Lupe and she had also voiced Holly in Mr. Mercedes. I appreciate the continuity. Her reading is so measured, in pretty much any situation. And this is perfect for the character of Holly. Lupe's voice is clear and easy to understand. Her voice matches the mental image I had created for Holly. The perpetrator's voices literally gave me goosebumps. Lupe does a great job of capturing the actions, emotions and more. A wonderful presentation of a an excellent story. Hear for yourself - listen to an excerpt of Holly

“I could never let Holly Gibney go. She was supposed to be a walk-on character in Mr. Mercedes and she just kind of stole the book and stole my heart. Holly is all her.” —STEPHEN KING. Here's hoping there are more stories with Holly.

Wednesday, September 6, 2023

The Raging Storm - Ann Cleeves

Ann Cleeves has penned the books that lead to two of my favorite British series - Vera and Shetland. She's a talented storyteller and I knew I would enjoy her latest book - The Raging Storm. It's the third book in the Detective Inspector Matthew Venn series, but can absolutely be read as a stand alone.

Jem Roscoe, a well known celebrity adventurer is found dead in a dingy during a storm at the harbor of Scully Cove and small village of Greystone. Venn is assigned the case, but he's not eager to return to Greystone. He has history with the village. The village is superstitious and full of legends. And then another body is found...

I adore character driven mysteries - and Cleeves is a master at this style. She has created a wonderful group of characters and I feel like I'm catching up with old friends when I start a new Venn book. Venn is smart, intuitive, honest and will go the extra mile to solve a case. His loves his husband Jonathan (as do I - his take on things is always frank, but thoughtful and light hearted.) The two DC's - Jen Rafferty and Ross May also have personal lives that continue to move forward with every book.

The setting is dark and atmospheric in this entry. Greystone is insular, and not overly welcome to outsiders. The inhabitants are unwelcoming and cautious with what they share.

And then there's the mystery. A great plot that kept me guessing. Just as I settled on my suspect, I was proven wrong. I'm also a fan of twists and Cleeves gives us a good one in the final chapter. I love the slower pace of the investigation. 

I choose to listen to The Raging Storm. The narrator was Jack Holden and he did a great job. His voice embodied the mental image I had created for Venn. He speaks clearly and is easy to understand. His voice has lots of movement, capturing the emotions, action, and more. I often find I become more immersed in a book when I listen to it. That was definitely the case with The Raging Storm. An excellent performance of an excellent book.  Hear for yourself - listen to an excerpt.

Tuesday, September 5, 2023

The September House - Carissa Orlando

If it's got a spooky house on the cover, it's a book I'm going to pick up! The September House is Carissa Orlando's debut novel - and the there is indeed a spooky house involved.

"Maybe if the two of us had paid more attention to any of the horror movies we'd seen over the years we would have been aware..."

Margaret loves her beautiful old home, as did her husband Hal. But after three years of ......... Hal has left, and Margaret is left alone in the house with ....... The September House is one of those books where it's better to go in cold and be surprised with Orlando's take on haunted houses. I was caught off guard in the beginning, but started coming to terms with what I thought was going on. But dropped hints, references and details changed the direction I had thought that the plot would take. Nicely done! There's lots of action in The September House and the last few chapters are nail biters.

Margaret is an interesting protagonist - how much of her narrative is the truth? Or is it all in her head? Her daughter is well drawn as well, but she's the other side of the coin. She was obnoxious, pushy and rude. But she plays her part of the tale well.

A fresh take on a haunted house tale. Bravo Carissa Orlando! See for yourself - read an excerpt of The September House. 

"Carissa Orlando has a doctorate in clinical-community psychology and specializes in work with children and adolescents. In her “day job,” Carissa works to improve the quality of and access to mental health care for children  and  their families. Prior to her career in psychology, Carissa studied creative   writing in college and has written creatively in some form since she was a child. It was only a matter of time before Carissa, an avid horror fan for much of her life, merged her understanding of the human psyche and deep love for storytelling into a piece of fiction." 

Photo credit: Cameron Massey.

Monday, September 4, 2023

Enola Holmes and the Mark of the Mongoose - Nancy Springer

Enola Holmes and the Mark of the Mongoose is the ninth entry in Nancy Springer's absolutely wonderful series. 

1890 London England. Enola is the much younger sister of Sherlock  and Mycroft Holmes. She too, is a brilliant detective. In the past she had to hide her skills behind a fake name on the office window. That is slowly changing. But what hasn't changed is her passion to be a "scientific perditorian, a finder of lost things and people."

This latest finds Rudyard Kipling looking for the 'real' detective to find his friend - an American book publisher who has gone missing in London. And even though she has not been formally hired, Enola is on the case.

Springer has written an excellent mystery, with elements I couldn't have imagined. Very clever! And I quite liked how the connections are made, how the clues fit together and more. I appreciate what detecting was like in this time - following hunches, interviewing people etc.

The setting was well described and the detail helped me to imagine it.

While this series is labelled as YA fiction, I think that anyone who enjoys the time, place and style of deduction would love Enola.

I chose to listen to Enola Holmes and the Mark of the Mongoose. I've said it before - sometimes I become more immersed in a book when I listen. That was the case with this book. Tamaryn Payne is the narrator and she did a fantastic job. Her voice embodied the mental image I had created for Enola. Her accent is pleasant, and lovely to listen to. She provided identifiable voices for the supporting characters making it easy to know who was speaking. (The Sherlock voice was perfect). The language is a big part of the books and Payne's reading is spot on. She infuses her words with just the right emotions, letting the words speak what she cannot say in polite society. Her passion and personality just shine through her voice. She captures the danger and action with her reading. An excellent presentation of of an excellent book. Hear for yourself - listen to an excerpt of Enola Holmes and the Mark of the Mongoose.

Friday, September 1, 2023

The Clementine Complex - Bob Mortimer

The bright orange cover of The Clementine Complex caught my eye -  and the description of Bob Mortimer's first novel sealed the deal.

"...a delightfully quirky mystery in the vein of Richard Osman and Nita Prose."

Gary is a bit of an odd duck as my gran used to say. But he's a nice guy. He's at a bar one night, having a pint with his co-worker Brendan when Brendan has to unexpectedly leave. That empty stool lets him start a conversation with the beautiful woman at the end of the bar, reading a book titled The Clementine Complex. She too leaves - but leaves the book on the bar. When Brendan goes missing and the Clementine woman can't be found either, Gary decides to start his own investigation.

I loved Gary! He's the guy you might not notice, and he's kind of used to it. But he sees everything. His interactions with some of the characters he meets through his investigation are downright laugh out loud funny. Gary meet some darker characters along the way, but he's still just Gary. I also loved the quirky supporting characters, notably his elderly next door neighbor Grace. His discussions with with a squirrel are quite quite entertaining.

Alongside the mystery of the missing people is a romantic thread as well. (You saw that coming, didn't you?) And that just being yourself is enough.

I chose to listen to The Clementine Complex as Bob Mortimer was the reader! It's always a treat to hear an author read their own work. For me Bob's voice completely embodies the character of Gary. The pauses, the emphasizing of dialogue, the emotions and action are perfect as he's the one wrote it all! He was joined by Sally Phillips who brought Clementine to life. 

If you enjoy British humor, as I do, this would a great listen for you. Hear for yourself - listen to an excerpt of The Clementine Complex. (Note that the book was released as The Satsuma Complex in Britain.)